Programme management PSC Contact points
Home Interreg IVB IIIB Projects
About the programme
Introduction
Application Procedure
» Find a project in your area
> Ongoing Projects Database
Implementing a Project

 Home / INTERREG IIIB / Find a project in your area / Ongoing Projects Database 
Berisp - Breaking Ecotoxicological Restraints In Spatial Planning
<< Back to the Project list in this Area

Description

This project aims at developing new approaches to soil contamination. There are about 2,000 km2 of brownfield sites in Europe today and the NWE region, with its high population density, faces increasing demand for open natural space. Many local authorities are confronted with problems regarding site conversion and soil pollution. The transnational partnership led by the University of Antwerp, brings together eight organisations including major planning authorities, leading organisatio [...]
See Full Description

Website
http://www.berisp.org/


 Berisp - Breaking Ecotoxicological Restraints In Spatial Planning

Lead Partner:
University of Antwerp
Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp
BE
Tel +32-.32-180370
Fax +32-32-180497

Contact:
Prof. Dr. Wim de Coen
Project Manager
Wim.decoen@ua.ac.be

Measure: 4.1

Start date: 2003/04/01
End date: 2007/07/01

ERDF Grant: € 1 673 222
Total eligible cost: € 3,3 M€


Partners involved:

BE - University of Antwerp,

NL - RIZA, Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Watermanagement, Directorate-General for Public Works and Watermanagement,

NL - Alterra,

NL - Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Watermanagement, Directorate Limburg,

BE - OVAM,

UK - Central Science Laboratory,

BE - AMINAL,


Project type: Action


Summary
This project aims at developing new approaches to soil contamination. There are about 2000 km2 of brownfield sites in Europe today and the NWE region, with its high population density, faces increasing demand for open natural space. Many local authorities are confronted with problems regarding site conversion and soil pollution. The transnational partnership led by the University of Antwerp, brings together eight organisations including major planning authorities, leading organisations in the field of brownfield site redevelopment, and applied research institutes that already assess contamination risks. The partners consider that current methodologies to assess soil contamination risks are defined essentially from a scientific perspective and not sufficiently from a planning standpoint. This scientific approach provides limited alternatives: either a drastic restriction of possible land uses or an expensive decontamination programme which in most cases is not feasible. The main objective and output of this project is the development of a Decision Support System (DSS). The latter will allow an iterative process whereby planning authorities will be able to test different types of landscape uses and habitat distribution against scientific data regarding potential risks of pollutants on living organisms. The software will include latest GIS technology to model accurately specie distribution, etc…Field studies will be carried out around two different landscape regeneration projects in Belgium and the Netherlands to validate the model and ensure that it meets with end-user needs and expectations at transnational level. The field studies will focus on hedgehogs and little owls which are key indicators on soil contaminants because they are at the top of the food chain. Once the system is developed and tested it will be widely promoted to potential end-users through relevant networks and organisations at European level.

Objectives
In the proposed project, based on the desires of all relevant partners involved in spatial planning (from the local community to governmental level) a new approach is proposed: the spatial structure will be incorporated into the risk-assessments addressing contamination. Application of such a new spatially structured concept will result in new options in solving contamination problems in spatial planning processes, because it is focussed on changes in habitat configuration as a possible remedy

Activities

Expected Outcomes
Creating new options in solving contamination problems in spatial planning processes, because it is focussed on changes in habitat configuration as a possible remedy. Knowledge on the spatially explicit uptake of contaminants by organisms, enables the definition of areas where potential risks of contaminants are highest, e.g. areas were contamination levels are higher, or areas which are exploited most intensively by organisms. Current methods only allow evaluation of risks after implementing of measure, e.g. monitoring of risks in the evaluation phase. Such a priori evaluation of measures will result in a more effective implementation of planning measures and also allows that other main stakeholders are involved in the evaluation process.

Top
cities&regions transport&it water&flood risks nature&heritage seas&ports